Curator’s Corner

21 10, 2020

Nobody Can Soldier Without Coffee

2020-10-23T10:03:03-05:00October 21st, 2020|2 Comments

One of the similarities between Frederic Remington and Winslow Homer as demonstrated through our current exhibit, In a Different Light: Winslow Homer & Frederic Remington, is that both artists made their start as illustrators working for the popular magazines of the period (Harper’s Weekly, Scribner’s Monthly, etc). One of their key assignments was as war correspondents. Remington focused on the American Indian Wars in the Southwest and later the Spanish American War in Cuba. Being from an earlier generation, Homer focused on the American Civil War. In 1863, Homer partnered with Boston publisher Louis Prang (who is sometimes referred to as the “father of the American Christmas card”) in a [...]

19 08, 2020

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: Cullercoats Fishergirls

2020-08-19T08:39:54-05:00August 19th, 2020|0 Comments

One of the themes of our current exhibition In a Different Light: Winslow Homer & Frederic Remington, is the exploration of both artists’ practice of repeating character types throughout their career. The exhibit includes a rotation of works on paper by Homer. One of the rotations features two works inspired by Homer’s visit to Cullercoats, England - Perils of the Sea (1888) and Scotch Mist (1883). Examination of the two artworks reveals Homer’s practice of reusing groupings of figures while reducing compositions to their essential story-telling elements.   Perils of the Sea | Winslow Homer | 1888 | Etching | Amon Carter Museum of American Art | 1983.58 Scotch Mist | Winslow Homer (1836-1910) | 1883 [...]

18 03, 2020

Who is Homer?

2020-03-18T09:39:00-05:00March 18th, 2020|0 Comments

Our current exhibit, In a Different Light, places the work by Frederic Remington alongside artworks by Winslow Homer. Our visitors and readers are likely familiar with Remington. But who was Homer? Winslow Homer (1836 - 1910) was one of the most popular and celebrated artists of late nineteenth-century America. A native of Boston, he was born the second of three brothers to Henrietta Benson and Charles Homer. Henrietta was herself a gifted watercolorist, and likely influenced her son to pursue artistic studies. Winslow Homer His earliest artistic training came in 1854 when Homer became an apprentice to the [...]

19 02, 2020

In a Different Light: Winslow Homer & Frederic Remington

2020-03-03T10:40:45-06:00February 19th, 2020|2 Comments

In March 2020, the Sid Richardson Museum will open In a Different Light: Winslow Homer & Frederic Remington. The exhibition will offer a reexamination of Remington alongside Homer, two giants in American art. Winslow Homer (1836-1910) was one of the most celebrated American painters of the 19th century. Likewise, Frederic Remington (1861-1909) is considered to be one of the greatest artists of the American West. Though born a generation apart, Homer and Remington were both at the height of their careers in the 1880s and 90s. Winslow Homer (1836-1910) | Two Figures by the Sea | 1882 | Oil [...]

18 12, 2019

The Gift That Keeps on Giving

2020-01-22T09:34:14-06:00December 18th, 2019|0 Comments

In 1948, A&M College of Texas (now A&M University), established the “Opportunity Award.” The scholarship intended to aid “worthy young men of Texas” who were unable to afford college without financial assistance. Sid Richardson contributed regularly to the fund for several years. Although he was a wealthy business man, Sid came from a humble background much like the young men the scholarship award supported. “I had it sort of rough when I was young, and I’d like to do something for underprivileged kids.” Jesse “Jack” Mercer Couch , 1951 Many of the recipients of the scholarship fund wrote Sid letters [...]

18 09, 2019

The Island Collection

2020-01-22T09:26:43-06:00September 18th, 2019|2 Comments

St. Joseph (San José) Island, 8 miles east of the coast of Rockport, TX, is a sand barrier island in Aransas County. The St. Joseph Island Ranch, a stretch of land 19 miles long and up to 5 miles wide, was purchased by Richardson in 1936. Exterior, Sid W. Richardson Residence | MAYNARD L. PARKER (1900-1976) | ca.1947 | Courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California “[Mr. Richardson] enjoyed [San Jose Island] because he could go down there and get away from everything and Perry [Sid’s nephew] liked that because he’d go down there and he liked to fish [...]

16 08, 2019

A Fortune in Oils

2020-01-22T09:23:36-06:00August 16th, 2019|0 Comments

Opening September 14, 2019, A Fortune in Oils: Sid Richardson's Personal Collection is a special exhibition that honors Sid Williams Richardson (1891-1959), who left a legacy through his personal collection of western masterworks and the foundation he established in 1947. Woven through the letters, photographs, publications, and his beloved paintings on display is the story of a plain-spoken, unpretentious, and intensely private man whose wealth, earned principally from West Texas petroleum, enabled him to pursue his interests as a cattleman, philanthropist, and collector of paintings. Peter Hurd, Portrait of Sid Richardson, 1958, Oil on panel, 32 x 48 inches [...]

10 06, 2019

Remington’s Fortress of Rest

2020-01-22T09:18:24-06:00June 10th, 2019|0 Comments

Although Remington spent his childhood growing up in rural Ogdenburg, New York, as a young man he quickly made his way to New York City where he spent most of his career. As he matured, Remington divided his time between the city and the country, which in this case was his childhood home in a region of New York state that's referred to as the North Country. By 1900, he had purchased an island in the North Country on the St. Lawrence River, an island he called Ingleneuk. Chippewa Bay, Frederic Remington Art Museum “I am in Chippewa Bay 10 [...]

15 05, 2019

The Yale Alumnus

2020-01-22T09:15:57-06:00May 15th, 2019|0 Comments

In the spring of 1878, Remington wrote to his Uncle Horace Sackrider, “I am going to try and get into Cornell College this coming June and if I succeed will be a Journalist. I mean to study for an artist anyhow, whether I ever make a success of it or not.” Unfortunately for Remington, Cornell University did not have a journalism department at that time. Fortunately for us, Remington enrolled in the newly created School of Fine Arts at Yale instead. Our blog featured a previous post about Remington’s time at Yale, which was short. His collegiate career last about [...]

17 04, 2019

For the Love of Birch Bark

2020-07-08T12:17:29-05:00April 17th, 2019|0 Comments

Remington loved canoeing. Despite his weight gain in his later years, which kept him from his love of horse riding, he quipped that he could always float. “If properly equipped, a man who sits at a desk the year through can find no happier days than he will in his canoe when the still waters run through the dark forests and the rapid boils below.” – Remington, 1893 Ingleneuk, Photo Album (Frederic Remington with Canoe), Frederic Remington Art Museum In the summer of 1892, Remington purchased a canoe and embarked on a 50 mile journey paddling the Oswegatchie [...]